Events

Apr 28, 2014 to May 09, 2014
(All day)
Building 149, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Mass.

The goal of this ambitious workshop is to demonstrate the ways in which a large variety of techniques are being applied to questions in human brain function. Participants will receive exposure to MRI, FMRI, DTI, DSI, MRS, PET, EEG, MEG, NIRS, DOT, TMS, and a variety of molecular and computational approaches to studying human brain function in vivo. There will also be some discussion of more invasive techniques such as implanted electrodes and direct cortical stimulation---tools that are used before and during surgery.

To bring this heterogeneous collection of technologies together, a number of unifying themes (in both the lectures and the classroom/laboratory activities) will be used. Unifying themes will include mode of activation (blood-based, electrical, trauma/clinical), physiological underpinnings (from basic biophysics of the effects to molecular and energetic considerations), psychological (using all modalities on the same questions), and others. Activities will include design of a variety of experiments, exposure to a variety of software tools, tours and demonstrations of the techniques in action, and selected keynote lectures to exemplify particular experimental domains in which many of these techniques have been brought to bear on a specific problem.

More information here.

Apr 30, 2014
12:00 PM
Seminar room 2204, 149 13th St., Charlestown Navy Yard

Nathan McDannold, Ph.D. 
Brigham and Women's Hospital
 
The physiology of the vasculature in the central nervous system (CNS), which includes the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and other factors, complicates the delivery of most drugs to the brain. Different methods have been used to bypass the BBB, but they have limitations such as being invasive, non-targeted or requiring the formulation of new drugs. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is a noninvasive method to locally and transiently disrupt the BBB at  discrete targets. This presentation will review the current status of this unique drug delivery technique, experience in preclinical models, and potential for clinical translation. If translated to humans, this method would offer a flexible means to target therapeutics to desired points or volumes in the brain, and enable the whole arsenal of drugs in the CNS that are currently prevented by the BBB.

Sep 11, 2014 to Sep 13, 2014
(All day)
The Kresge Auditorium Building W16 48 Mass. Ave. (Rear) Cambridge, MA 02139

The Fourth Biennial Conference on Resting State / Brain Connectivity will bring together key researchers working on technical advances and methodological issues in imaging the brain’s functional connectome. In addition to the major topics of earlier years, the conference will include sessions on multi-modal imaging approaches to measure brain structure as well as brain function and include human imaging methods and animal models. Approximately one third of the conference will be dedicated to applications of brain connectivity methods and models in neurological and psychiatric disease. There will also be a special session dedicated to emerging technologies.

More information here.

Sep 29, 2014 to Oct 03, 2014
(All day)
Building 149, Charlestown Navy Yard, Charlestown, Mass.

Students in this course will receive a firm grounding in the fundamentals of fMRI. This will include the basic physics of MR imaging, the biology and biophysics of the hemodynamic responses to neural activity, data analysis (including both exploratory and statistical analyses), stimulus presentation and response recording in the context of high magnetic fields and electromagnetic pulses, and the design of perceptual and cognitive experiments. Some advanced topics (especially related to issues of connectivity) have been added.

A special emphasis of the course will be the design, implementation, and execution of perceptual and/or cognitive experiments by the participants. Participants will break into small groups to design their own fMRI experiments. Barring unforeseen problems, some of these experiments will be executed, and the resulting data analyzed, on the final day of the course. The core faculty is drawn from the staff of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center (of the Massachusetts General Hospital and Massachusetts Institute of Technology) and affiliated faculty from Harvard University, Boston University, McLean Hospital and other institutions.

More information here.